Untangling Sources, Transport and Ecosystem Responses to Contaminants, Pollutants And Other Stressors in South Florida Aquatic Ecosystems

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Todd A. Crowl, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University

Seminar Title: FIU's CREST Center for Aquatic Chemistry and Environment:  Untangling Sources, Transport and Ecosystem Responses to Contaminants, Pollutants And Other Stressors in South Florida Aquatic Ecosystems

When: Oct. 13, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Abdiel E. Laureano-Rosario/Frank Muller-Karger

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Last modified on Wednesday, 11 October 2017 12:35

Recent Antarctic expeditions uncover clues to Antarctic ice sheet evolution and climate sensitivity

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Since she was an undergraduate, Dr. Amelia Shevenell has been interested in how ocean and atmospheric temperatures influence Antarctica’s ice sheets in the distant and not-so-distant past.

For at least 34 million years, Antarctica has been partially or completely covered in ice. Plate tectonics positioned Antarctica over the pole more than 65 million years ago, and drove India, Australia, and South America northward during the breakup of the supercontinent, Gondwana. This tectonic break-up formed the Southern Ocean, which encircles Antarctica. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current now mostly isolates Antarctica from heat derived from lower latitudes, but not completely. South of the Polar Front, warm nutrient-rich waters formed in northern latitudes upwell, bringing heat to Antarctica’s ice sheets. Both modern and geologic observations indicate to Dr. Shevenell that oceanic and atmospheric warming influences Antarctica’s ice sheet stability. 

NSF funded research aboard the US ice-breaker R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer in 2014 is yielding new information on the role of ocean and atmospheric temperatures on East Antarctica’s ice sheet evolution.

US Icebreaker R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer

Photo By:  Amelia Shevenell

By studying the marine geologic record close to Antarctica’s ice sheets, researchers seek to understand the mechanisms by which glaciers retreat when climates were as warm or warmer than present. During the 2014 expedition to the Sabrina Coast, East Antarctica, Shevenell and her collaborators discovered that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is more sensitive to climate changes than previously thought. This is important because global sea level would rise 53 meters (174 feet) if the East Antarctic Ice Sheet melted completely. More realistically, ice melt from the most sensitive regions of East Antarctica could raise global sea levels ~19 meters (~60 feet). Glaciers along the Sabrina Coast are presently retreating and could contribute 3–5 meters (9–16.5 feet) of global sea level rise in a warming world.

Glaciers Along the Sabrina Coast

Photo:  Amelia Shevenell

Shevenell, USF graduate students, and collaborators collected evidence that ice expanded to the Sabrina Coast in the early-to-middle Eocene, much earlier than is traditionally accepted. They discovered deep channels carved into sediments and evidence for least 11 glacial advances and retreats across the continental shelf. These results indicate variability of regional glaciers may have been enhanced by large amounts of meltwater during the Oligocene and Miocene, geologic times when climate was warmer and atmospheric CO2 higher than at present. About seven million years ago as global climates cooled, regional glaciers expanded, stabilized, and were not influenced by meltwater. These results indicate that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet has long responded to climate variability. If meltwater increases as with continued warming, Antarctica’s ice sheets might respond more dynamically than expected.

In early 2018, Dr. Shevenell will return to Antarctica aboard the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) drillship, the JOIDES Resolution. Dr. Shevenell and her USF CMS Ph.D. student, Imogen Browne, will work with an international team of scientists to drill sites in the Ross Sea, which will enhance understanding of Antarctica’s ice sheet evolution over the past 20 million years. This cruise is particularly exciting because Dr. Shevenell has worked for over a decade on proposing and planning this Expedition.    

As researchers explore Antarctica, more data is generated that can be plugged into ice and climate models to improve our collective understanding of ice sheet response to ongoing warming. Model improvements will ultimately enable scientists to make accurate estimates of regional sea level rise, which are critical to policy makers, particularly those in low-lying regions, such as Tampa Bay.

Written By: Sean Beckwith

Last modified on Tuesday, 10 October 2017 18:13

Natalie Sawaya wins best early career presentation at international conference

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Natalie Sawaya, a PhD student in the Breitbart lab at the USF College of Marine Science was selected for the Best Early Career Scientist presentation at the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) conference for her talk about using environmental DNA to decode marine biodiversity in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. 

The 2017-2018 Fellowship and Award Recipients

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Congratulations to all the 2017-2018 Fellowships and Awards recipients.  Listed below are the students and the Fellowships/Awards that they received.
 
2017-2018 Fellowship Recipients

Renate E. Bernstein Outstanding Authorship Award - Brittany Leigh, PhD Candidate


Renate E. Bernstein Outstanding Authorship Award - Mengqiu Wang, PhD Candidate


David K. Costello Award for Interdisciplinary Engineering - Anthony Greco


Sackett Prize for Innovative Research Fund - Erin Symonds, PhD 2017


William and Elsie Knight Endowed Fellowship Fund for Marine Science - Imogen Mireille Browne, PhD Student


William and Elsie Knight Endowed Fellowship Fund for Marine Science - Alexandeer Ilich, PhD Student


Bridge to the Doctorate Endowed Graduate Fellowship - Loraine Martell-Bonet, PhD Student


St. Petersburg Downtown Partnership Fellowship in Coastal Science - Gabriel A. Browning, PhD Student


Garrels Memorial Fellowship in Marine Science Marcy L. Cockrell, PhD Candidate


Paul Getting Endowed Memorial Fellowship in Marine Science - Katelyn Schockman, MS Student


Jack and Katharine Ann Lake Fellowship in Marine Science - Ryan Venturelli, PhD Student


Young Fellowship Program Fund - Dana M. Nieuwkerk, PhD Student


Gulf Oceanographic Charitable Trust Fellowships Endowment - Shannon Burns, MS Student


Gulf Oceanographic Charitable Trust Fellowships Endowment - Natalie A. Sawaya, PhD Student


William T. Hogarth Fellowship in Marine Mammals - Greta Helmueller, MS Student


George Lorton Fellowship in Marine Science - Alexandria Creasy, MS Student


George Lorton Fellowship in Marine Science - Meaghan E. Faletti, MS Student


George Lorton Fellowship in Marine Science - Elizabeth S. Herdter, PhD Candidate


Oceanography Camp for Girls Fellowship - Makenna Martin, MS Student


Tampa Bay Parrot Head Fellowship in Marine Science - Shuangling Chen, PhD Candidate


Thomas E. Pyle Memorial Fellowship in Marine Science - Michelle E. Guitard, PhD Student


Carl Riggs Fellowship in Marine Science - Theresa King, PhD Student


Sanibel-Captiva Shell Club / Mary and Al Bridell Memorial Fellowship - Travis Mellett, PhD Student


Linton Tibbetts Endowed Graduate Student Fellowship - Chelsea C. Bonnain, PhD Student


Anne and Werner Von Rosenstiel Fellowship in Marine Science - Garrett L. Miller, MS Student


Anne and Werner Von Rosenstiel Fellowship in Marine Science - Luis Sorinas Morales, PhD Student


Anne and Werner Von Rosenstiel Fellowship in Marine Science - Catherine Prunella, MS Student


Anne and Werner Von Rosenstiel Fellowship in Marine Science - Brent Summers, PhD Student


Wells Fargo Fellowship in Marine Science - Adrienne Hollister, MS Student


Mahaffey Family Graduate Fellowship in Marine Science - Brittany Leigh, PhD Candidate


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Last modified on Tuesday, 10 October 2017 14:40

Poop and perception: A transdisciplinary approach to managing coastal microbial water quality in Costa Rica

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Erin Symonds, Sackett Award winner

Seminar Title: Poop and perception: A transdisciplinary approach to managing coastal microbial water quality in Costa Rica

When: Oct. 5, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Mya Breitbart/David Naar

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The role of siderophores in the uptake and cycling of iron

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Randie Bundy, University of Washington

Seminar Title: The role of siderophores in the uptake and cycling of iron

When: Sept. 29, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Kristin Buck

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USF Researchers Awarded $5 Million Grant to continue study in BP Oil Spill

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - USF College of Marine Science researchers will continue studies on how the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill has impacted the environment and how future environmental disasters might be better mitigated.

Read full USF article here

Last modified on Tuesday, 26 September 2017 17:44

Mark Luther Cited in Washington Post

TAMPA, FL - "The storm weakened as it raked Cuba. As Irma approached Southwest Florida, where its eye would fall was a guessing game, said Mark Luther, a University of South Florida oceanographer who studied National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data showing Irma’s strength and path.

Even with weaker winds, “If it veers to the left of us, we’re going to get hammered,” Luther said, because the storm would lift the shallow waters of the bay and shove up to 12 feet of water on land. But it stayed well to the east. “The storm also moved quickly through the area so that the winds didn’t have time to push as much water toward the coast and up the bay,” Luther said." 

Read full article

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 September 2017 15:12

Methane Plumes in the Deep Northern Gulf of Mexico

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Chris Martens, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Seminar Title: Methane Plumes in the Deep Northern Gulf of Mexico

When: Sept. 22, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Mark Luther

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RF Sensors for Remote Sensing the Earth and the importance of RF Spectrum Management

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Sandra Cruz-Pol, University of Puerto Rico at Mayguez

Seminar Title: RF Sensors for Remote Sensing the Earth and the importance of RF Spectrum Management

When: Sept. 21, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: David Naar/Bernard Batson/Frank Muller-Karger

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Last modified on Wednesday, 20 September 2017 13:02