Towards Regional Sea Level Projections

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Benjamin Hamlington

Affiliation: Old Dominion University

Seminar Title: Towards Regional Sea Level Projections: Assessing the Contribution of Natural Climate Variability to Regional Sea Level Rise.

When: Mar. 13, 2015 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Don Chambers

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From space to the ocean floor: Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variations from GRACE ocean bottom pressure anomalies

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Felix Landerer

Affiliation: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

Seminar Title: From space to the ocean floor: Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variations from GRACE ocean bottom pressure anomalies

When: Oct. 30, 2015 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Don Chambers

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Melting Greenland ice sheet may affect global ocean circulation, future climate

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Don Chambers from the University of South Florida, along with colleagues in Canada and the Netherlands, have determined that the influx of fresh water from the Greenland ice sheet is "freshening" the North Atlantic Ocean and could disrupt the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), an important component of global ocean circulation that could have a global effect. Researchers say it could impact the future climate in places such as portions of Europe and North America.

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Sea Level Rise in Florida: Science, Impacts, and Options

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Sea levels are rising - globally and in Florida. Climatologists, geologists, oceanographers, and the overwhelming majority of the scientific community expect a continuation of this trend for centuries to come due to climate change, ocean warming, and ice mass loss.


While Florida’s natural history indicates that there is nothing new about the changing elevation of the sea, what is new is its accelerating pace. Also new—and alarming—is the ever-growing, immobile human infrastructure near the coasts: high-rise condos, suburban developments, tourist meccas, and international metropolises. In a state where much of the landscape is topographically low and underlain by permeable limestone, the stakes are particularly high. Modern-day sea level rise, with potential impacts to large land areas and populations, poses unprecedented challenges for sustainability, urban planning, and political action.


This book offers an in-depth examination of the cycle of sea levels in the past and the science behind current measurements and future projections. The authors assess the most likely range of sea level rise in Florida based on a synthesis of projections for the next hundred years. They also discuss ongoing and potential consequences for natural marine and coastal systems and how we can begin to plan strategically for the inevitable changes.

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