News and Events

Corals and their microbial symbionts: a model systems approach

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Dr. Cory Krediet

Affiliation: Eckerd College

Seminar Title: Corals and their microbial symbionts: a model systems approach

When: Oct. 28, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Mya Breitbart

Join event on Facebook

 

CORE Investment Management participates in The Ocean and Me Tour

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Guests from CORE Investment Management participated in “The Ocean and Me” tour at CMS. They experienced what it feels like to be on a research vessel thanks to the Florida Institute of Oceanography as well as learned how ocean technology has increased the precision and resolution of data thanks to the Ocean Technology Group. Many were surprised that our Paleo Lab scientists get to play with mud every day and that most abundant organism in the ocean are viruses as shared by the Marine Genomics Lab.

Everyone left CMS amazed by the vast amount of research underway to better understand the ocean’s vital impact on us and our ability to impact the ocean.

 

The Ocean and Me Tour

View the Ocean and Me Tour Album on Facebook

Last modified on Thursday, 13 August 2015 17:34

Cristina Subt Publishes Antarctic Deglaciation Paper

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Cristina Subt, a USF College of Marine Science Ph.D. student, has just published her first first-authored paper:  http://bit.ly/1PjGvO6

Please join us on congratulating her.

Crossing the Ross Sea Polynya and other antics

ROSS SEA, ANTARCTICA - The JOIDES Resolution is now following RV/IB Nathaniel B Palmer into the Ross Sea Polynya, which is Earth’s largest ice making factory. Cool air temperatures encourage surface water freezing which creates sea ice. Strong winds then move this ice around, freeing up more space for sea ice formation. The Ross Sea is highly productive in the summer months, where sunlight, a stable water column, and abundant dissolved nutrients stimulate huge phytoplankton blooms. These blooms are consumed by krill, which are consumed by predators like penguins, seals, and whales.

View the full article by Imogen Browne

Last modified on Thursday, 18 January 2018 14:18

Crude Oil Plumes in Crossflow AND Underwater Flight by the Sea Butterfly

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. David Murphy

Affiliation: University of South Florida College of Engineering

Seminar Title: Crude Oil Plumes in Crossflow AND Underwater Flight by the Sea Butterfly

When: Sept. 9, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Dr. Gary Mitchum

Join event on Facebook

 

David Helvarg Lecture on Ocean Policy

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Join the Students, Faculty and Staff of the College of Marine Science in a discussion with author and journalist David Helvarg on the needs issues and of our times, and particularly where our nation is going in terms of policies to manage uses of the ocean.

Date/Time: Tuesday November 8, 2016; 3:30 - 5:00 pm
Venue: College of Marine Science / MSL Conference Room
(End of Bayborough Peninsula, MSL Building)
140 7th Avenue South, St.Petersburg, FL 33701, USA
727.553.1630

----------------
Summary:
A Blue Vision to restore our Ocean 

David Helvarg is an author, journalist and Executive Director of Blue Frontier (www.bluefront.org), an ocean conservation and policy group.

Among his books are ’50 Ways to Save the Ocean’ ‘Saved by the Sea’ and ‘The Golden Shore – California’s Love Affair with the Sea’ (just out in paperback).  In his talk he will share some of the trauma and wonder he has experienced in, on and by the ocean. Whether reporting on coral bleaching and a military coup in Fiji, boarding suspect fishing vessels off Iraq, or watching penguins vomiting krill for science in Antarctica, his are startling and sometimes quite funny reflections on the present state of our seas.

While discussing the cascading disasters that threaten the ocean he will also explain why he is more frustrated than despairing, and provide examples of the common-sense solutions that can solve the many threats to our blue planet – if we can mobilize the political will to enact them.  He will propose actions the next President and Congress can take to restore the blue in our red, white and blue and will discuss what we can each do individually and as citizens - including a Blue Vision Summit that will take place in Washington D.C. in May of 2017 - to effect change from the bottom up and top down to restore our ocean, coasts and the communities – both human and wild - that depend on them.

His presentation with ocean imagery will remind you of the intimate ways in which all of our lives are linked to the natural world around us.

---------------------------
DAVID HELVARG
Executive Director, Blue Frontier Campaign

David Helvarg is Executive Director of Blue Frontier and the author of six books: Blue Frontier, The War Against the Greens, 50 Ways to Save the Ocean, Rescue Warriors, Saved by the Sea and The Golden Shore. He is editor of the Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide, organizer of ‘Blue Vision’ Summits for ocean activists and the Peter Benchley Ocean Awards (co-hosted with Wendy Benchley), and winner of Coastal Living Magazine’s 2005 Leadership Award and the 2007 Herman Melville Literary Prize.

Helvarg worked as a war correspondent in Northern Ireland and Central America, covered a range of issues from military science to the AIDS epidemic, and reported from every continent including Antarctica. An award-winning journalist, he produced more than 40 broadcast documentaries for PBS, The Discovery Channel, and others. His print work has appeared in publications including The New York Times, LA Times, Smithsonian, National Geographic, Popular Science, Sierra, and Parade. He’s done radio work for Marketplace, AP radio, and Pacifica. He has led workshops for journalists in Poland, Turkey, Tunisia, Slovakia and Washington DC. He is a licensed Private Investigator, body-surfer and scuba diver.

Last modified on Thursday, 03 November 2016 18:56

Deep-sea corals and methane seep communities of Atlantic submarine canyons

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Sandra Brooke, Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab

Seminar Title: Deep-sea corals and methane seep communities of Atlantic submarine canyons

When: June 15, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Chris Stallings

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 14 June 2017 14:06

Detailed numerical modelling of fluid flow and morphodynamics with OpenFoam

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Niels Jacobson

Affiliation: Deltares

Seminar Title: Detailed numerical modelling of fluid flow and morphodynamics with OpenFoam

When: Sept. 15, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Patricia (Soupy) Dalyander (USGS)

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Friday, 23 September 2016 15:39

Detection of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and tropical storm activity during the last 2900 years using Beppu Bay anoxic sediment cores

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Masanobu Yamamoto (Hokkaido University) & Leonid Polyak (Byrd Polar Research Center, the Ohio State University)

Seminar Title: Detection of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and tropical storm activity during the last 2900 years using Beppu Bay anoxic sediment cores

When: Feb. 20, 2017 3:00pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Brad E. Rosenheim

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Friday, 17 February 2017 15:46

Developing the Capacity to Generate Coastal and Shallow‐Water Basemaps for Tropical Island Nations and Territories of the Pacific

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the University of South Florida College of Marine Science, through Dr. Frank Muller-Karger, has partnered with researchers at the University of Fiji to map coral reefs at two study sites in Fiji using satellite imagery, field surveys, and local knowledge from the native Fijian villagers who have used the resources of these habitats for centuries. In addition to creating high-resolution benthic habitat maps, the purpose of this project is to train Fijian researchers to conduct reef-monitoring research and build their capacity to carry out long-term habitat conservation goals. During the summer of 2016, USF Ph.D. candidate Matt McCarthy traveled to Fiji for 4 weeks to train Fijian personnel in reef-assessment field work and satellite-imagery mapping. The on-going project should establish a baseline from which future monitoring may be done to evaluate changes in Fijian reefs, and help guide management of these vital resources.

Device that detects faux fish is catching on

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - The market is showing an interest in technology developed through the University of South Florida that can instantly determine whether a grouper is really a grouper. In the future, similar technology may signal whether wild-caught shrimp, tuna and red snapper live up to their claims, and even whether that glop floating offshore is really an example of the scourge known as red tide.

A USF professor and former graduate student obtained a patent last year on GrouperChek, a test that identifies the target gene in grouper to determine whether it’s actually grouper or a common substitute such as tilapia or catfish.

Read the full article here

Downscaling Simulation of Oceanic Responses to Climate Change

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Changsheng Chen

Affiliation: Univ. of Massachusetts - Dartmouth

Seminar Title: Downscaling Simulation of Oceanic Responses to Climate Change: A Global-Basin-Coastal-Estuarine Resolving FVCOM System

When: Feb. 3, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Chuanmin Hu

Join event on Facebook

 

Dr Tim Conway awarded USF New Researcher Grant

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Dr Tim Conway, a new Chemical Oceanography Faculty member at USF College of Marine Science and School of Geosciences, has received a USF New Researcher Grant from USF Office of Research and Innovation (April 2017), entitled "Investigating the influence of the Gulf Stream System on micronutrient cycling in the North Atlantic Ocean".

This grant will fund a biogeochemistry cruise onboard RV ANGARI transecting the Southern Gulf Stream Jet from Florida to the Bahamas, working with the ANGARI non-profit foundation (http://angari.org/) to educate the public about ocean issues and communicate results from the cruise. The scientists on board from Conway's MarMITE laboratory and Dr Kristen Buck's group at CMS will investigate the distribution and biogeochemical cycling of metals such as iron and zinc, metals which are vital trace nutrients for marine organisms. Overall, the project aims to better understand the importance of the gulf stream in providing connections in trace metal cycling between the Gulf of Mexico, the loop current and the North Atlantic Ocean - especially important in the light of events such as oil spills in the Gulf.

This project will also be the first to make use of CMS' new multi-collector mass spectrometer (Thermo Neptune Plus) recently acquired as part of the new Tampa Bay Plasma Facility in the College of Marine Science at USF. This new instrument will allow us to measure tiny variations in the isotopic ratios of the trace metals even at the vanishingly-small concentrations of these metals in seawater.

Last modified on Tuesday, 11 April 2017 14:14

Drawn to the Sea: Florida Women in Marine Science

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - A short film developed as part of Julie Meyer's 2015 L'Oreal USA For Women in Science fellowship. This video prominently features several people from our the College of Marine Science and the St Pete community and highlights diversity of scientists at USFCMS.

Last modified on Thursday, 11 May 2017 18:13

Evaluating impacts from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Cam Ainsworth's laboratory is evaluating impacts from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on the biota and fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico.  A key aspect to this study is using the 1979 IXTOC oil spill as an analog to understand long-term consequences of the spill and mitigation decisions.  His lab is also developing next generation tools and strategies for ecosystem-based fisheries management in the United States.  Efforts include evaluation of potential management instruments such as harvest control rules, marine protected areas and artificial reefs.  Cam Ainsworth and his students and staff use a range of statistical, agent-based, and box models to consider the interplay between physics, chemistry and biology of the oceans.

Visit The Fisheries and Ecosystem Ecology Lab

Last modified on Friday, 08 April 2016 17:26

Evolutionary and Ecological Dynamics of Extracellular Electron Transfer

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Jeffrey Gralnick, University of Minnesota

Seminar Title: Evolutionary and Ecological Dynamics of Extracellular Electron Transfer

When: Feb. 16, 2018 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Larry Dishaw (USF Health)

Jeffery Gralnick's Research

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 14 February 2018 16:10

Examining groundwater connections between the Mississippi River and adjacent deltaic wetlands in Louisiana

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Jaye Cable

Affiliation: University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Seminar Title: Examining groundwater connections between the Mississippi River and adjacent deltaic wetlands in Louisiana

When: April 22, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Christopher Smith (USGS)

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Tuesday, 19 April 2016 20:10

Expedition 356: Indonesian Throughflow Live Video Broadcast

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - One of our own PhD candidates has been chosen to sail on the Integrated Ocean Discovery Program’s (IODP) drill ship, R/V JOIDES Resolution. Christian Haller will be sailing as a micro paleontologist/biostratigrapher on the 60 day cruise to examine the paleoceanography of the Indonesian Throughflow.

He will be broadcasting their real time scientific results as well as other topics such as life on board one of the largest (145 m long) and most unusual research vessels in the world. It is an honor to be chosen to fill one of the scientific positions especially for a graduate student. He will be joining about 26 mostly more senior scientists from approximately 10 different countries making his experience a truly international one. 

Click on the link below to fill out the live video broadcast request form. 

http://bit.ly/1K45rSw

Last modified on Wednesday, 05 August 2015 18:09

Exploring the Deep Ocean with NOAA

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - An essential component of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) mission is to enhance ocean science literacy and enhance understanding why it is important to explore our little-known ocean world. To help fulfill this mission, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Education Materials Collection was developed to encourage educators and their students to become engaged with expeditions and discoveries made by the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer—America’s first Federal ship dedicated to ocean exploration.

Educators are invited to join NOAA OER facilitators to learn Why We Explore (Volume 1) and How We Explore (Volume 2) the deep ocean. Participants will learn about the importance of ocean exploration and the advanced technological capabilities of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer used to explore the deep ocean. This 7-hour professional development will introduce standards-based, handson activities and online resources that guide classroom teaching and learning. Ocean health, sophisticated underwater mapping technologies, unique deep-sea ecosystems, remotely operated vehicles and telepresence are just a few of the topics covered.

Registration is required and space is limited. Educators will receive the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Education Materials Collection Volume 1: Why Do We Explore? and Volume 2: How Do We Explore?, additional resources and a NOAA Ocean Exploration Certificate of Participation. Continental breakfast, lunch and a $75 stipend will be provided.

View Flyer for more information

Last modified on Friday, 23 September 2016 15:40

Exploring the Deep Ocean with NOAA in 2018

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Educators are invited to join NOAA OER staff to learn more about the importance of ocean exploration, current exploration technologies, and recent deep-sea discoveries. On Saturday, March 24, 2018 from 8:00am - 4:00pm the Professional Development workshop will introduce standards-based, hands-on activities and other resources that guide classroom teaching and learning. Ocean health, unique underwater habitats, underwater mapping and remotely-operated vehicles are just a few of the topics to be addressed.

Register Here

View Flyer

Last modified on Tuesday, 20 February 2018 12:25

Exploring the Deep Ocean with NOAA Professional Development Workshop

ST. PETESRBURG, FL - Join us Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 8:00am - 4:00pm for a Professional Development Workshop for Educators of Grades 6-12.

Educators are invited to join NOAA OER staff to learn more about the importance of ocean exploration, current exploration technologies, and recent deep-sea discoveries. This full day Professional Development workshop will introduce standards-based, hands-on activities and other resources that guide classroom teaching and learning. Ocean health, unique underwater habitats, underwater mapping and remotely-operated vehicles are just a few of the topics to be addressed.

To Register Click Here

View Exploring the Deep Ocean with NOAA Flyer

Join the event of Facebook

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 09 August 2017 18:07

Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Kaustubh Thirumalai, Brown University

Seminar Title: Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

When: July 20, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Julie Richey

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Thursday, 13 July 2017 13:24