News and Events

Tampa Bay Marine Science Networking Happy Hour Event

ST. PETERSBURG - The next Tampa Bay Area Marine Science Networking Happy Hour is Tuesday February 24th, 2015, 4:30-6:30pm.  The event will be held at the 
Canopy Rooftop Lounge atop the Birchwood Hotel, 340 Beach Dr. NE, St. Petersburg, FL 33701. They have a nice selection of cocktails, beer and wine including happy hour specials and nearby street or garage parking is available. The event is self pay and name tags will be available.

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Last modified on Friday, 20 February 2015 14:26

Tampa Bay Marine Science Networking Happy Hour Event June 28 2017

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Our next Tampa Bay Area Marine Science Networking Happy Hour will be on Wednesday, June 28th 2017 at 4:30-6:30pm at newly opened Lolita's Urban Wine Market located at 16 18th Street S. St Petersburg, FL 33712.  The event is self pay and name tags will be provided. You can park on the street or in the stadium overflow lot across from the market beneath the interstate which is not patrolled since it is not a Ray's game night.  They have wine (as the name suggests) - But they also have beer from all 7 of the local breweries. In addition they have amazing chacuterie.  Their Wednesday wine specials are $5 per glass.

***SPECIAL FREEBIES FOR ANY GARDENERS ATTENDING***

Find a potential employer or collaborator, a new grad student, a new major professor - or just meet other science professionals outside your office, because networking is not just for when you are not working. Please share this notice and join us and bring your ocean science professional friends and colleagues.

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Last modified on Wednesday, 28 June 2017 11:53

Tampa Bay Marine Science Networking Happy Hour Event June 8 2017

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - We are celebrating World Ocean Day for the next Tampa Bay Area Marine Science Networking Happy Hour.  It will be this Thursday, June 8, 2017 at Ale & the Witch in the Courtyard Shoppes, 111 2nd Ave NE, Saint Petersburg, FL 33701 from 4:30-6:30pm.  They have a new happy hour called the witching hour until 6pm (M-Th) when all pints and tulip glasses are just $4.  You can park in the garage to the north, other nearby garages, or in street meters.  The event is self pay and name tags will be provided. Share this invitation with your ocean professional friends.

After, you can move the World Ocean Day party over to the FREE family fun Blue Ocean Film Festival movie in Straub Park, with shorts and a feature screen of the best in show film Bag It going on until 10pm. Or you can stick around A&W’s courtyard for some live music by Kyle and Shannon at 8pm.

Save the dates for future happy hours: June 28, 2017 and July 18, 2017, places TBA soon.

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Last modified on Monday, 05 June 2017 15:10

Tampa Bay Marine Science Networking Happy Hour Event Oct 24 2017

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Our next Tampa Bay Area Marine Science Networking Happy Hour will be tomorrow Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 4:30-6:30pm at Canopy Rooftop Bar atop the Birchwood Hotel, 340 Beach Dr. NE, St Petersburg, FL 33701.  The event is self pay and name tags will be provided. You can park at street meters or in nearby garages.  Please share this notice and join us and bring your ocean science professional friends and colleagues.

Last modified on Wednesday, 25 October 2017 16:51

The 2015 Eminent Scholar Lecture Series

ST. PETERSBURG, Fl - The Eminent Scholar Lecture Series (ESLS) is a two day lecture series held annually during the Spring semester. The ESLS is presented by the USF College of Marine Science, and the
US Geological Survey , and sponsored by the Tampa Bay Times. The ESLS brings in four speakers from institutions across the United States and abroad to address a given marine science topic.  All lectures are open to the public.


Spring 2015 ESLS: Frontiers in Marine Science

 

ESLS Frontiers in Marine Science

 

Dates: April (9-10) 2015, Thursday and Friday

Time: 1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Location: Karen A. Steidinger Auditorium, FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, USFSP, 100 Eighth Ave. S.E., St. Petersburg, FL

Contact: 727-553-1130

View pictures of this year's event

Last modified on Tuesday, 14 April 2015 13:58

The 2016 Eminent Scholar Lecture Series

ST. PETERSBURG, Fl - The Eminent Scholar Lecture Series (ESLS) is a two day lecture series held annually during the Spring semester. The ESLS is presented by the USF College of Marine Science, and the
US Geological Survey , and sponsored by the Tampa Bay Times. The ESLS brings in four speakers from institutions across the United States and abroad to address a given marine science topic. All lectures are open to the public.


Spring 2016 ESLS: Extreme Events in the Ocean System

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Watch Live 4/7/16 & 4/8/16 at 1:30pm est.

Extreme Events in the Ocean System

 

Extreme Events in the Ocean System 

Dates: April (7-8) 2016, Thursday and Friday

Time: 1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Location: Karen A. Steidinger Auditorium, FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, USFSP, 100 Eighth Ave. S.E., St. Petersburg, FL

Contact: Howard Rutherford at 727-553-3376

 

The St. Petersburg SciCafé is at the Dali Museum

“Featuring Francisco Chavez”
When: Thursday, April 7, 2016
Time: Reception at 6:00PM &
The Panel Discussion is from 6:30PM-7:30PM
1 Dali Blvd, St. Petersburg, FL 33701
Event Contact: H. Rutherford, 727-553-3376

Last modified on Wednesday, 13 April 2016 11:59

The 6th anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Today is the 6th anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the northern Gulf of Mexico. A live stream of the 'Dispatches from the Gulf' will be held today via YouTube at 2pm est and 7pm est.

The documentary highlights research from GoMRI members following the oil spill. If you haven't seen the film, it features USF and C-IMAGE researchers throughout. Especially the summer Mud & Blood sampling cruises aboard the R/V Weatherbird II.

Additional Articles:

6 years later, USF charting long-term effects of BP oil spill - Tampa Tribune

USF scientists have prominent role in new oil spill documentary narrated by Matt Damon - 10 ABC Action News

USF researchers study impact of gulf oil spill - FOX 13 News

Oil spill inspired greater scientific knowledge of Gulf of Mexico - Tampa Bay Times

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 April 2016 17:01

The dynamics of carbon stocks in wetlands under a changing climate: from permafrost thaw to sea-level rise

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Miriam Jones

Affiliation: USGS

Seminar Title: The dynamics of carbon stocks in wetlands under a changing climate: from permafrost thaw to sea-level rise

When: Feb. 11, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Chris Smith (USGS)

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Last modified on Thursday, 03 March 2016 15:49

The Ferrojan Horse Hypothesis

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Chelsea Bonnain, Mya Breitbart, and Kristen Buck recently published a paper in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science entitled "The Ferrojan Horse Hypothesis: Iron-Virus Interactions in the Ocean". This exciting interdisciplinary paper (http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2016.00082/full) suggests that phages (viruses that infect bacteria) may play an important role in the cycling of iron, which is a limiting trace metal in the ocean. 

The last deglaciation after halftime: A sea-level perspective

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Tor Tornqvist

Affiliation: Tulane University

Seminar Title: The last deglaciation after halftime: A sea-level perspective

When: Jan. 29, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Brad Rosenheim

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Last modified on Wednesday, 27 January 2016 19:02

The Ocean and Glacier Retreat in Patagonia

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Dr. Carlos Moffat

Affiliation: University of Delaware

Seminar Title: The Ocean and Glacier Retreat in Patagonia

When: Oct. 14, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Eugene Domack

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The role of siderophores in the uptake and cycling of iron

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Randie Bundy, University of Washington

Seminar Title: The role of siderophores in the uptake and cycling of iron

When: Sept. 29, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Kristin Buck

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The Tampa Bay Water Story

TAMPA, FL - The Tampa Bay estuary holds unique characteristics and requires us all to play an active role in keeping our coastal communities healthy. It's a collaborative effort to monitor, maintain and care for Tampa Bay and it is an example of years of work that turned the tides on poor conditions several decades ago. It's crucial now, that we all understand that we have to actively pay attention and as much as we appreciate the beauty of living near the Bay, we have to work together to protect and preserve it for generations to come.

Documentary: http://bit.ly/TB-WaterStory

Website: http://bit.ly/TampaWater

Last modified on Tuesday, 27 September 2016 18:28

Three long short-stories from the Atlantic

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Hjálmar Hátún

Affiliation: The Faroe Marine Research Institute

Seminar Title: Three long short-stories from the Atlantic

When: March 4, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Dr. Anni Djurhuus / Dr. Mya Breitbart

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Last modified on Thursday, 03 March 2016 16:01

Today, the ratio of plastics to fish in the ocean is 1:5

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Every minute, the equivalent of one dump-truck’s worth of plastic is dumped into the sea. By 2050, it is predicted that there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. This is unthinkable. The USF College of Marine Science is so proud of Frank Muller-Karger’s and CJ Reynolds work with the NOAA Marine Debris Program to help educate the community about plastic pollution. The Current Collections sculpture, made from plastic trash collected in our community, has been given a permanent home in Poynter Park on the USFSP campus. Let’s all make a vow to eliminate or at least reduce our use of plastic bottles, to recycle what we use, and to stop using plastic straws.

Please consider supporting this important initiative by clicking here.

Trace metal chemistry: less is more

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - One billion liters of seawater would be required to gather just 25 grams of iron, yet this trace element is essential to every form of life on the planet.  A group of scarce but biologically important elements in the ocean, referred to as trace metals, can either limit the growth of organisms or be toxic, depending on the concentration.  Dr. Tim Conway has recently joined the College of Marine Science and brings a wealth of understanding of trace metals, in part due to extensive interaction with the International GEOTRACES program, a study of the marine biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes.  As a cruise participant and data contributor to the NSF funded U.S. GEOTRACES program, Dr. Conway is intimate with the methods of collecting seawater for trace metal analysis and is instrumental in the creation of compiled products that are used by scientists around the world. 

One of the marquee products of the GEOTRACES program is an electronic atlas of oceanographic profiles in the form of surface to bottom cross-sections that display changes in the concentration of a particular element along the entire path of ocean-traversing cruises (see image below). 

Profile of dissolved iron in the Atlantic Ocean compiled from GEOTRACES cruise data, and available at eGEOTRACES.  Graphics by Reiner Schlitzer.

Dr. Conway’s upcoming projects include a cruise aboard the research vessel of the Angari Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing together scientists and the public with the goal of widely communicating important ocean issues.  The cruise will sample the southern jet of the Gulf Stream, charting a course from Florida to the Bahamas. 

Research is also underway to examine the role of circulation, biology, and islands on the distribution of metals and their isotopes in the waters around Antarctica.  The recently completed Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition provides an abundance of data to be tackled by a collaboration of Swiss, Australian, and U.S. based scientists.

Changes in the concentrations of trace metals can have impacts on the environment and, in turn, on society.  Changes to land use can affect concentrations of dust blown iron in the oceans, which can act as a fertilizer to increase productivity of organisms at the base of the food chain.  Alternatively, changes in pollution levels can affect concentrations of trace metals and increase toxicity in areas.  As Dr. Conway notes, “[Trace metals] really can affect where things die and where things live in the ocean.”  Great strides have been made in recent years, and the exciting field of trace element chemistry is poised to provide very useful solutions to environmental challenges.

Last modified on Tuesday, 30 May 2017 12:34

Tracking Sargassum since 2010

St. Petersburg, Fl - Sargassum spp. is a brown macroalgae that is abundant in the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic. Providing food, shade, and shelter to fish, shrimp, crabs, turtles, and other marine organisms, Sargassum serves as an important habitat in the marine ecosystem. However, excessive Sargassum landing on the beach represents a nuisance and health hazard, which is also a burden to coastal management, local tourism and economy. In 2015, many beaches in the Caribbean and Mexico suffered from Sargassum landing, with numerous news reports on their local impacts. To date, however, no one knows what caused the dramatic increases in Sargassum landing in 2015.

The Optical Oceanography Lab (http://optics.marine.usf.edu) has been tracking Sargassum since 2010 using satellite imagery and numerical models, and has provided near real-time daily imagery on the Web. A recent effort by PhD student Mengqiu Wang led to the findings that the aerial coverage of Sargassum in the central West Atlantic in 2015 is at least 4 times of the coverage in 2011 when major Sargassum landing on the Caribbean beaches were also widely reported. The reasons behind such an increase, however, still remain to be explained.

Washington Post Article: Mexico deploys its navy to face its latest threat: Monster seaweed

Last modified on Tuesday, 03 November 2015 16:44

Training Fijians to Monitor their Coral Reefs

Viti Levu, Fiji - "With the support of USAID’s Pacific-American Climate Fund (PACAM), the University of South Florida is training local mapping experts from the University of Fiji to utilize advanced geographic information system (GIS) platform services. The system’s satellite imagery provides a tool for rapid and accurate assessments that can be compared over time and with other locations. This will improve the University of Fiji’s mapping techniques for future research and environmental impact assessments. The team visited the project sites in Fiji and reviewed field data collection and verification procedures."

"Through USAID/PACAM’s grant to the Developing Base Maps of Tropical Aquatic Resources in the Pacific project, PACAM is helping the University of Fiji to use GIS technology in mapping and monitoring the reefs surrounding Votua Ba and Maui Bay on the Fijian island of Viti Levu. This project will enable the Fijian government and the communities to protect their coastal and marine resources for the future." - quoted from USAID Weekly Update newsletter. 

Tropical Storm Hermine bearing down on USF C12 buoy

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - USF's C12 research and monitoring buoy is 220 nautical miles (253.171 miles) from Tropical Storm Hermine's center and now seeing winds gusting over 40 knots. The path of the storm should take the center slightly to the north of C12's position on the west Florida Shelf.

C12 Research and Monitoring Buoy Live Data Feed

Last modified on Thursday, 01 September 2016 18:12

Tuna is Delicious & Other Lessons Learned from the Japanese Longline Fishery

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Dr. Robert Ahrens

Affiliation: University of Florida

Seminar Title: Tuna is Delicious & Other Lessons Learned from the Japanese Longline Fishery

When: Sept. 30, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Liz Herdter/Murawski Lab

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Last modified on Wednesday, 28 September 2016 17:11

Turbulent cascades and intermittency in winds over the Tropical Pacific

ST. PETERSBURG -

Speaker: Dr. Greg King

Affiliation: Institute of Marine Sciences (CISC) Barcelona, Spain

Seminar Title: Turbulent cascades and intermittency in winds over the Tropical Pacific

Seminar Abstract: Under typical conditions, turbulent fluid motions are three-dimensional and energy cascades from large scales to small scales. However, in the atmosphere over the range of scales governing weather henomena (the mesoscales: 2-2000 km), geophysical constraints (stratification, rotation, thin atmosphere) decouple motions into layers.  This quasi-two-dimensional flow motivates a picture of stratified turbulence with an upscale cascade (from small scales to large scales). To test this picture of turbulence requires an observational dataset of global winds -- an enormous undertaking.  Attempts to provide a definitive answer on the cascade direction eluded investigators until Erik Lindborg (1999) proposed a test based on Kolmogorov's third-order structure function law (the most rigorous result in turbulence theory). This test, when applied to a dataset of global upper troposphere winds, indicated, to great surprise, that the cascade was downscale.

In this talk I will describe the application of the third-order structure function test to the mesoscale winds over the Tropical Pacific Ocean. The winds we studied were measured from space by instruments (called scatterometers) carried on the NASA QuikSCAT satellite and the European MetOp-A satellite.  Our analysis supplied further surprises: evidence for both upscale and downscale cascades, depending on geographical region and season. Our results show that turbulence models need to include information about air-sea interaction.

When: March 24, 2016 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Boris Galperin

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Last modified on Tuesday, 22 March 2016 16:49

Two CMS researchers to participate on IODP Expedition 374 to the Ross Sea, Antarctica

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - CMS Ph.D student Imogen Browne and CMS Assistant Professor Amelia Shevenell have been selected to sail on International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 374 to the Ross Sea, Antarctica in early 2018. The two month expedition will drill sites in the Ross Sea that will enable a better understanding of the evolution of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet over the last 20 million years. Reconstructing ice sheet response during past warm climates is critical for modeling and predicting future ice sheet response and global sea level rise. This expedition was first proposed by Shevenell and her collaborators in 2012, following a workshop at USF CMS. Both Browne and Shevenell will sail as two of the ten Americans in the 35 member international science party.

The two month expedition aboard the D/V Joides Resolution, will leave from Wellington, New Zealand in January of 2018. Browne will sail as a Physical Properties specialist and Shevenell will lead a team of eight Sedimentologists. Post cruise, the two will conduct geochemical analyses of the recovered sediments to understand the role of ocean temperatures in West Antarctic Ice Sheet evolution

Last modified on Thursday, 26 January 2017 22:14