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Message from the Dean


cover-photo3 Welcome to our Summer 2014 CMS newsletter. From satellites to genomic sequencers, our faculty, researchers and students continue to explore the seas from global to microscopic scales. We have been successful in securing funds for research and fellowships, but we are always looking for new and novel ways to fund the research and outreach enterprises.

Dean Jacqueline Dixon

In this issue we feature an article on the research of Amelia Shevenell, Eugene Domack, and their students, who have strengthened our capabilities in Antarctic geology and paleoceanography. We also provide you with introductions to the research of our three new faculty – Kristen Buck, Brad Rosenheim, and Eugene Domack. You will get an update on our research on the long-term impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster (C-IMAGE), while we wait to hear the status of our renewal proposal.

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Alumni notes include updates from Elizabeth Cockey, Ruoying He, Sunny Jiang, Andy Squires, and Beau Suthard. In mid-July, we received breaking news that Ruoying He was awarded a Distinguished Professorship at North Carolina State University. Well deserved, Ruoying!

If you can schedule a visit, we have several exciting events planned. On October 18, we will be participating in the Fourth Annual St. Petersburg Science Festival with a number of interactive activities that showcase our research and innovation and provide an opportunity for our faculty and students to interact with more than 25,000 visitors.

On November 3-9, the Blue Ocean Film Festival will be in St. Petersburg. This will be a wonderful event with screening of over 100 ocean and environmental films, workshops for filmmakers, and panels of experts discussing ocean issues. In addition, if you are in the area, we now have monthly happy hours at various watering holes in St. Petersburg. It is a great way to stay in touch and expand your professional network.

Stay connected with current events and updated infomation at the College of Marine Science by visiting our USFCMS news page, Facebook page and our
Twitter page.


Go Bulls,

Jacqueline Dixon, Dean, College of Marine Science

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Albert C. Hine Professor, Faculty Alumni Director

hine@usf.edu

This is our second College of Marine Science Newsletter (Rising Tides v.2 Summer 2014).. We plan to issue two/year—one in winter and one in summer. I invite you to examine the Rising Tides v.1, Winter 2014.

So, please send to me any news about yourself. We particularly want to hear from those of you who been out in the wide, wide world for some time—those of you who graduated in the 1980’s, 1990’s, 2000’s, or even earlier. But, even if you have just left us, please let us know where you are now and something about your new life, post CMS. Send photos of yourself or family shots, or group shots with your colleagues. We also need to keep up with your email address changes—send them to our Development Officer, Howard Rutherford, who is also a CMS alumn.

As I said in my section of the v. 1 Winter 2104 issue, I am a big believer in field trips. Unfortunately, there was insufficient interest in a CMS Alumni trip to Cuba. Perhaps, it was a bit pricey? Rather than giving up, if there is sufficient interest in a field trip to the beautiful Bahama Banks (see space photo), I am willing to co-lead a trip to Eleuthera Island where we would stay at the
Cape Eleuthera Institute where we would spend 5 days examining the world famous Schooner Cay ooid shoals, patch reefs, sea grass beds, and the amazing island geology. The cost would be about $1,800/person that would be all inclusive. Spouses are welcome. But, I need to know if there is sufficient interest by mid Sep for a mid March 2015 trip. Please email me as soon as you can. Finally, if you cannot participate on this CMS Alumni field trip, maybe you might be persuaded to donate funds to support graduate student field trips to the Bahamas, Cuba, or other key educational, marine science oriented places in the Caribbean (i.e., Discovery Bay Lab on north coast of Jamaica).

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Howard Rutherford, CMS Development Officer


USF Foundation Board member George Morgan and his wife, Jane, are supporting the Bulls in a big way with an $8 million planned gift to the university and part of the donation will help ensure the future success of USF College of Marine Science.

The gift provides $3 million to establish the George & Jane Morgan Endowment for Excellence in Marine Science. The gift also provides $2 million to Athletics and $3 million to the College of Business.

“An endowment gift like this one is of vital importance for the College of Marine Science,” said Dean Jacqueline Dixon. “It will provide our faculty and students with a steady source of funding that may be used to enhance the academic enterprise at the college, providing a boon for both education and research.”

The official announcement was made at the Feb. 28 USF Foundation Board at the start of the second phase of the USF: Unstoppable Campaign.

“I am delighted that Jane and I can make these gifts to the University of South Florida,” said Morgan, a 1976 USF graduate. “As a longtime member of the USF community, I have seen firsthand the ways in which giving improves the lives of our students and faculty. Through these endowed gifts, Jane and I know that we will also make a difference for generations to come. I hope, through our example, to inspire others to think of giving to the USF System when they are making their estate plans.”

I look forward to strengthening the existing relationships with donors of the College of Marine Science and cultivating new ones. Please feel free to contact me at 727.553.3376 or hrutherford@usf.edu.

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Expedition to the Totten Glacier, Antarctica challenges CMS faculty and students to uncover subglacial meltwater outflow

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Women scientists were out in force for NBP14-02

by Dr. Eugene Domack, Professor, College of Marine Science

There are fewer, more remote regions on earth than the coasts of Antarctica and around the continent there are even some places that are more remote than others. This past January-March three USF CMS graduate students and two faculty ventured to the Sabrina Coast off the East Antarctic Ice Sheet as part of an NSF funded interdisciplinary investigation into the dynamics of the

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Totten Glacial System. This coast is truly mare incognita as the margin here did not even have a single bathymetric survey line from which to judge water depth.

The investigation was centered here because the large East Antarctic Ice Sheet funnels the drainage of an expansive network of sub glacial lakes (including famous Lake Vostok) toward the Sabrina Coast. It was planned to study this margin in order to resolve the role that these subglacial lakes may have played in the stability and morphology of the ice sheet and the continental shelf, respectively. It is one of the regions of the Antarctic Ice Sheet that has been detected to be dropping in elevation in the era of satellite glaciology, and the question is, why? Analogies to other rapid drawn-down systems of the ice sheet would suggest a role for warm ocean waters-- as a melting agent acting beneath the ice shelf outlets that enter along the Sabrina Coast. But no one had made any significant ocean temperature measurements, much less delineated pathways along the seafloor by which warm currents could invade.

Let it not be said that women scientists were not out in force for NBP14-02. With Mt Wellington in the background standing on the flight deck of the N. B Palmer as the ship left Hobart on January 28th are (back row left to right): Chief scientist Amy Leventer (Colgate University), Michelle Guitard (USF-CMS), Kara Vadman (Colgate Univ. & USF-CMS), Mikelia (Colgate Univ.), Katie Smith (USF-CMS), Tasha Snow (USF-CMS), Caroline Lavoie (Univ. Aviero, Portugal), Alex Post (Geoscience Australia), Natalie (LDEO), Kelsey Winslor (Univ. Wisconsin-Madison), Amanda (front row left to right):Leanne Armand (Macquarie Univ.) and Amelia Shevenell (USF-CMS).

Assistant Professor Amelia Shevenell and Professor Eugene Domack were part of a team of marine geologists, oceanographers, and geophysicists that sailed on the US research icebreaker N.B. Palmer from Hobart Tasmania to the Sabrina Coast, a transit that took approximately 7 days. The project was the third program funded by the Office of Polar Programs under the guidance of a new program in Integrated Antarctic System Science.

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Featured Science Article - Cont


cover-photo3The group of investigators included those from: Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Univ. Texas-Institute of Geophysics, Texas A&M Department of Oceanography, and Colgate University. Investigators from Geoscience Australia and Macquarie University were also involved. Students included our own Katie Smith, Michelle Guitard, Tasha Snow, and (soon to be CMS graduate student) Kara Vadman.


Location of our study area off the East Antarctic Ice Sheet in central Wilkes Land and direction of our transit to and from Hobart Tasmania across the SE Indian Ocean.

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While remoteness is one reason why the Sabrina Coast is so poorly known it’s also a region respected for its unpredictable sea ice cover and during the cruise NBP14-2 we did experience our share of “tough ice” having been stuck on at least two occasions for about 48 hours.

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At three AM local time the massive East Antarctic Ice Sheet rises in the distant horizon as the N. B. Palmer makes its way through loose pack ice off the Wilkes Land Coast

Our studies included recovery of multibeam swath bathymetry and high resolution seismic reflection data that revealed a highly unique seafloor – one which exhibited features never before seen on the Antarctic margin including large scale parabolic dune fields, strange lobate accumulations of glacial sediment and extensive subglacial channel networks deeply carved into crystalline bedrock.

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Featured Science Article - Cont


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Spectacular views of the seafloor morphology along the boundary of cryrstallie bedrock (green) and glacially sculpted sedimentary units (blue). Scale is approximately 25 km across bottom, with north to the top. The modern ice sheet is off image, to the right.

All are signs of extensive subglacial water extrusion from beneath the margin of the ice sheet at some time in the past. There is evidence in the seafloor sediment (from cores) that such activity includes some recent (modern) outbursts as well as near catastrophic scale events some time during the last deglaciation.

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Evidence for warm water intrusion was also discovered but not in the manner we expected and these results will change the view on how heat can be conducted to the deep vulnerable margins of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.

The cruise lasted nearly two months at sea and the team was treated to some spectacular Antarctic scenery, as well as an unusually resplendent aurora australis on our journey home. Friendships were formed, collaborations developed, and new science discoveries added to the U.S. Antarctic research effort. It was hoped, by all involved, to be just the beginning of an expanded USF-College of Marine Science presence in the southern ocean, our first steps in this direction were substantial and rewarding.

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The day shift watch chief (Amelia Shevenell) and chief scientist (Amy Leventer) rejoice at the recovery of the Eocene-Oligocene boundary sandstone via dredging operations off the Mertz Glacier Tongue.

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CMS Faculty Spotlight - Kristen Buck


cover-photo3I have been enamored with the oceans since I was a child, growing up in Oregon and making regular weekend family trips to the coast to fly kites, explore tide pools and occasionally make a brief dash into the (very cold) sea. But beyond a short stint, circa 3rd grade, of wanting to be a marine biologist, I did not envision a career in marine science until late in university.

Kristen Buck, Associate Professor USFCMS

Instead, I started my undergraduate studies at Pacific Lutheran University with an eye towards pre-med and chemistry. I got my first taste of independent research courtesy of the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program, which funded my participation in chemistry research at Pacific Lutheran and at the University of Bordeaux in France (I was a double major in Chemistry and French).

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The chemistry research I was conducting at that stage was far removed from the oceans, focusing on organic and physical chemistry techniques to investigate polymer blends. But the REU was formative, and as my four years in college came to an end, I found myself pursuing applications to graduate schools in chemistry research instead of to medical schools. It was during this process that one of my professors, who had a PhD in Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, pointed out that there was an entire field of chemistry devoted to the oceans and I broadened my application pool to include marine chemistry programs. When I interviewed with Professor Ken Bruland at the University of California Santa Cruz, he told me the story of iron in the oceans- the challenges of measuring an element that is abundant in the crust of the earth (not to mention the hull of a ship!) but so low in the oceans as to limit productivity in vast regions. Simply put, I was in- hook, line and sinker. Following the completion of my PhD in Ocean Sciences at Santa Cruz in 2006, I moved to San Diego for a two-year postdoctoral appointment with Dr. Kathy Barbeau, where I expanded my sampling and analytical experience to include conducting biological experiments with the trace elements iron and copper. I joined the faculty at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, a U.S. research institution in Bermuda, as a research scientist in 2009. While in Bermuda, I had the opportunity to participate in the newly launched GEOTRACES program, an international program aimed at characterizing the distributions and cycling process of trace elements and isotopes in the oceans. I also had the privilege of serving as an instructor for the Partnership for the Observation of the Global Ocean (POGO) program, teaching General Oceanography and Chemical Oceanography to postgraduate students from developing nations and mentoring the students in independent research projects. My research today focuses on the chemical forms of iron and copper in the marine environment, and on understanding the processes that govern the cycling of these important elements in the oceans. I have always intended my career to be a balance between teaching, mentoring and research, and I am thrilled to join the faculty at the University of South Florida College of Marine Science to continue pursuing this balance. I am truly excited to begin mentoring graduate students.

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CMS Faculty Spotlight - Eugene Domack


cover-photo3I have always enjoyed being on the water, although I was born and raised in the glacial moraine country of Eastern Wisconsin. My fondest memories are of moving across the wetlands and lakes of my home state and so it was I attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison where I majored in Geology & Geophysics. There I was taught by some very gifted and dedicated teacher scholars, I have not met many like them since.

Eugene Domack, USFCMS Professor and his daughter Madison off the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

The adventure of the Southern Ocean called in the enticing manner of John B. Anderson, who was to be my MA and PhD advisor through graduate school at Rice University. But I was also schooled there in the finer points of carbonate sedimentology by James Wilson and seismic stratigraphy by Albert Bally.

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I learned a great deal in a short stint with UNOCAL , helping to explore basins in the Frontier District of the Gulf of Mexico Division, spending a great deal of time on deep water rigs (back then that meant 1000’ water), and scouting for source rocks in the Newark Supergroup. Academia called me back to Wisconsin in a far too short teaching appoint in Eau Claire and then on to a tenure track position at Hamilton College. There I was fortunate to work with some very exceptional students and build a niche for myself by mentoring undergraduate research in Antarctic marine geology. My proudest accomplishment remains the close personal interaction I was able to share with over 100 students who deployed on marine expeditions to Antarctica over the years.

In my time at Hamilton (28 years) I had the great fortune and freedom to developed a keen interest in ancient periods of glacial calamity, so called “icehouse to greenhouse” transitions. I have studied the stratigraphic and geochemical transition of these events-- always placing them into some sort of analogy with the deglacial processes seen in modern Antarctic margin sequences. In this way I was able to join in on some exciting research on the Snowball Earth. This work took me to Namibia (five field seasons), East Greenland, and Svalbard. I have also worked to develop the first basal Permian geochron (absolute age) for Gondwana and documented orbital scale oscillations in environmental change in the Late Paleozoic of Tasmania.

But it is the Antarctic marine Quaternary record that keeps me most busy, having served as chief scientist on over 18 research cruises and been involved in two ODP investigations of the margin—including the first U.S. proposed site to ever be drilled on the Antarctic margin--the Palmer Deep, during Leg 178. Recently I have served as the lead PI on the interdisciplinary and international LARISSA project, the first program funded by NSF under the new Antarctic Integrated System Science initiative. My family (Judi and Maddie) and I are so very thankful to be joining the USF-College of Marine Science community and to have been given such a warm welcome.

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CMS Faculty Spotlight - Brad Rosenheim


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Brad Rosenheim, Associate Professor USFCMS

I am thrilled to have joined the faculty of CMS in January 2014! I am a paleoceanographer, looking at oceanography of the recent and geologic past. And, like most oceanographers, I wear many hats. Through my childhood in New Jersey, my undergraduate years at the University of Vermont (B.S., 1999), my graduate work at the University of Miami (Ph.D., 2005), my postdoctoral years at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and my first faculty appointment at Tulane University, I have learned to blend geology, chemistry, field work, wrench-turning, and computing into a career revolving around assessing past oceans and climates.

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My interest in paleoceanography took root early as an undergraduate. I started my undergraduate career as an Environmental Studies major, but quickly became dissatisfied with the curriculum. I wanted to know the science behind the many doomsday forecasts we were learning - upcoming food shortages, population growth, consumption of resources, and, of course, climate change. How were those trends and scenarios supported? I was realizing at that point that I was a scientist and quickly changed my major to satiate my skepticism. I like to say that, in that sense, I am a true climate skeptic! From this point, my academic home was in a geology department, using the past to better understand our evolving instrumental climate record.

A pivot point in my career came one snowy May day in Vermont, as I walked to campus to discuss honors thesis topics with an adviser. Trudging through the spring snow with the only nearby shoreline being the west coast of New England, I focused on a future studying the oceanography in the tropics. I did research on corals in Honduras as an undergraduate, corals and sclerosponges in the Bahamas and Caribbean as a Ph.D. student, and tropical N. Atlantic as a postdoctoral investigator. All along I developed new tools and stayed on the forefront of analytical techniques for paleoclimatology. That led me to new areas, and, ironically, back into the ice-covered parts of the globe. Although my latest chapter is here in balmy south Florida, I have become more focused on polar science with projects on Arctic soils and Antarctic marine sediments, all of which record our past climate and carbon cycle function in areas sensitive to change. One significant perk of joining the faculty of CMS is the ability to join forces with other Southern Ocean geological oceanographers, Eugene Domack and Amelia Shevenell, as well as other physical, chemical, and biological oceanographers that work in the Southern Ocean.

The faculty and students have earned many awards and accolades since the winter newsletter. We now post the good news about each of these on the main CMS website.

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Bits and Pieces—News-tidbits from CMS Graduates


We really would like you, as our graduates, to tell us something about yourselves—please submit input to Al Hine and/or Howard Rutherford.

cover-photo3David Mearns, MS 1986, was a regular participant for a while on CNN helping to describe the complexities of the search for Malaysian Flight 370 presumably resting on the seafloor in the eastern Indian Ocean. He is now recovering one of Vasco da Gama’s shipwrecks off Oman.


cover-photo3Boris Wawrik, PhD 2003, got tenure at University of Oklahoma, Norman. The same day he had the birth of his second son.



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cover-photo3Ruoying He, PhD 2002 has just been designated (July 17, 2014), Distinguished Professor of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University. Ruoying held our prestigious Knight Fellowship while here at USF, then went from post-doctoral status to an assistant scientist position

at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute before being recruited to NCSU.



cover-photo3Jyotika Virmani, PhD 2005, is the Director of Technical Operations for the Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE and is based at the XPRIZE Foundation in California. XPRIZE designs and operates Global Prize Competitions that provide the impetus for rapid innovation, resulting in new technologies that tackle the Grand Challenges of our time. The Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE is a global competition to develop more accurate and affordable pH sensors so we can being to truly measure and understand the extent of ocean acidification. She is also continuing her hurricane blog despite distractions from earthquakes and other west coast maladies.

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Alumni Notes - Elizabeth Cockey, M.S., 1994


cover-photo3BOEM's Elizabeth (Cockey) Burkhard, (CMS M.Sc. 1994), accepted the Partners in Conservation certificate from Secretary Jewell on behalf of 14 partner organizations and more than 100 participants in the Ocean Renewable Energy Stewardship Partnership, at the 2013 Department of the Interior Partners in Conservation Awards ceremony, held on January 16, 2014.



Elizabeth (Cockey) Burkhard

Beth guided 6 federal partners, 8 contract recipients and dozens of staff through the process of requirements gathering, proposal review and selection, and contract performance.

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The eight projects answered information needs surrounding renewable energy development in offshore waters (3+ miles from the beach - mostly), providing new baseline environmental information, frameworks and protocols for determining what environmental information is relevan to collect for a particular place and installation, and a visual simulation tool that uses real world data to generate a picture of a proposed facility from any viewpoint and under different weather and other visual clutter conditions.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/boemgov/12108620834/

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Alumni Notes - Ruoying He, Ph.D., 2002, CMS, USF

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Ruoying inside Alvin, during his dive to 2500 m in the Gulf of Mexico

I joined the College of Marine Science, USF in April 1998. Six months earlier, I had met Prof. Bob Weisberg when he visited China for the first time and gave a series of wonderful lectures to a group of scientists and students (me included, being probably the most naive one) in Qingdao. I have always been very interested in coastal ocean processes, so I contacted Bob, applied for USF’s CMS program, and became his Ph.D. student. My dissertation topic was on the dynamics of west Florida shelf (WFS) circulation.

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Working with Bob and Profs. John Walsh and Gabe Vargo, I was fortunate to also get involved in ECOHAB-WFS, a project focused on understanding and predicting regional harmful algal blooms (HABs). For two years, I and two other graduate students (Eric and Bill) in Bob’s group took turns jumping aboard RV Suncoaster to join other biologists to conduct monthly hydrographic surveys off Tampa, Sarasota and Fort Myers. Those field activities were very intense but also extremely rewarding. I remember countless moments casting CTDs and taking water samples station by station, and watching breathtaking sunsets/sunrises and dolphins surfing the bow waves of Suncoaster, as well as a few times being chased by hurricanes! During the process, I got to know many good friends and colleagues, was able to publish my first set of scientific papers, and most importantly, began to realize the value of combining observations with numerical modeling analyses in solving complex, interdisciplinary research problems. I defended my dissertation in June 2002, and then stayed on as a postdoc in Bob’s group for another 10 months before leaving for Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in April 2003 to take on an institution postdoc scholarship. I remember I was quite emotional the day before I took off when I said good bye to my advisor and many other professors and friends in the college. I felt like a little kid who had been very fortunate to be surrounded by tremendous kindness, knowledge, guidance, and support in a family, and the time had finally come to venture into an unknown world on his own. Bob told me that getting a Ph.D. degree is like getting a driver’s license: the real “road test” starts in a long journey afterward. He was absolutely correct.

I very much enjoyed the scientific environment and interactions at WHOI, and was hired by the institution in 2004 as an assistant scientist. During the next three years, I received funding from NSF, NOAA and ONR and was able to expand my research to the northeast U.S. coastal ocean, focusing on shelf circulation dynamics and interactions with the Gulf Stream, as well as HAB problems in that region.

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Alumni Notes - Cont - Ruoying He, Ph.D., 2002


In collaboration with other scientists, I spent lots of time at sea doing multi-disciplinary surveys in the Gulf of Maine, developed a coupled ocean circulation and HAB numerical model to better understand HAB population dynamics, and started using this model to provide seasonal predictions and weekly nowcast/forecasts of ocean circulation and HAB conditions for coastal managers and the general public. I also got interested in developing and applying various data assimilation methods to combine in situ and satellite observations with model simulations in order to generate more accurate ocean state analyses. All of these research activities helped broaden my scientific vision and network, and sharpen my research skills. My family had been very much spoiled by the sunny and warm Florida weather, however, so it was quite hard for us to endure the cold and snowy winters in Woods Hole. “We’ve got to move south,” my wife said firmly one day after a bad blizzard.

Thus I joined the faculty of North Carolina State University in 2007. My wife was quite happy with the area and mild weather, and I enjoyed the opportunity to teach and interact with many more undergraduate and graduate students. I worked hard climbing the academic ladder at NC State and was promoted to full professor in 2012. During the last 7 years at NC state, while still carrying out research projects and collaborations in the northeast, I developed new funded research projects and collaborations to study more closely circulation dynamics in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the southeast U.S. coastal ocean. Along with postdocs and students in my lab, I also expanded our research areas to marine ecosystem dynamics, remote sensing, air-sea interactions, and regional climate impact assessment. Combining in situ and remotely sensed observations with sophisticated coupled numerical modeling tools remains our central research approach.

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I made a major effort to diversify our observational program and data sources, including deploying moorings to measure water column time series, running glider (AUV) surveys to obtain four-dimensional coastal hydrography, and most recently employing the deep sea submersible Alvin to survey the ocean bottom (see photo below). International collaboration with scientists and students in Asia, Europe, and South America is another research activity that I have been pushing in the last several years.

Like many other professors, my daily agenda is full of tasks: attending meetings and research cruises, writing papers and proposals, advising students and postdocs, and conducting various services for the university and scientific community. Although I am very busy and my schedule is sometime hectic with many deadlines, I am quite pleased to see my students and postdocs progressing well and competing successfully for prestigious fellowships and faculty positions. Together we are doing a lot of very interesting and valuable research for our society. I still remind them from time to time about a remark Bob once told me: “Enjoy the time in graduate school, because it is the time you can best concentrate and excel.”

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Alumni Notes - C. Sunny Jiang, Ph.D. 1990-1996


cover-photo3I arrived at USF Marine Science on the New Year eve of 1990. I came from China soon after the 1989 Chinese Student Movement in Tiananmen Square to seek the freedom of speech. I remember the first few days of my arrival in Tampa Bay area clearly. My advisor John Paul and my fellow Ph.D. student Marc Frischer came to pick me up from the airport. I did not know how to open the door of Marc’s car and had trouble using fork and knife to eat BBQ chicken at John Paul’s new year’s party.


C. Sunny Jiang, Taken at Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Reinventing Toilet Fair, March, 2014, New Delhi, India

My three years of M.S. research was followed by four more years of Ph.D. work with John Paul. I learned so much from John Paul and many other faculty at Marine Science. My favorite time was TGIF when faculty and graduate students could communicate freely, which built strong bonds of community.

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I made lasting friendship with many faculty and fellow students in Marine Science. Several of them are my best friends and we meet up regularly to explore the world as we used to be in Marine Science.

Following the Ph.D. in Marine Science, I joined the Center of Marine Biotechnology at University of Maryland. Under the direction of my postdoctoral mentor, Professor Rita Colwell, I was able to connect what I have learned in microbial ecology with public health. My work has bridged the understanding of pathogenicity evolution in natural marine bacterium Vibrio cholerea. I was offered a faculty position at University of California, Irvine within the first year of my postdoctoral position. I postponed the faculty position for six months to complete my work in Dr. Colwell’s group and joined the faculty at UC Irvine in the Fall of 1998.

It is hard to believe that it has been 16 years since I first arrive at UC Irvine. I have moved from Assistant, Associate to Full professor over the years but it all seems just yesterday. I am a professor of Environmental Engineering. My research involves microbial ecology, water quality, desalination and water reuse but my passion is still in the ocean health and its beneficial uses. I am working closely with engineers and scientists from many different disciplines to develop understanding and strategies for sustainable development of water and energy resources. My most recent project is funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to provide water and sanitation for the majority of people on this planet.

Marine Science did not only give me a satisfactory career but also gave me a family. I married a follow graduate student Scott Pichard when we were both graduate students at Marine Science. My advisor John Paul, Joan Rose and many other faculty and students were at our wedding. My daughter Nicole Pichard is 12 years old now. She is the pride of my life. I also developed a hobbit of running from the years in Marine Science. I am proud to be a USF Marine Science alumnus.

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Alumni Notes - Andy Squires, M.S., 1984


cover-photo3I graduated in 1984 under Dr. Thomas Hopkins with considerable tutelage from Dr. Gabriel Vargo. My graduate experience provided a solid foundation in oceanography with emphasis on zooplankton and phytoplankton ecology. A couple of teachable moments have stuck with me over the years. Dr. Hopkins once said “my job is to teach you how to teach yourself,” and Dr. Vargo emphasized how good science begins with proper and repeatable

Andy Squires, Banks of Brooker Creek at Lake Tarpon, Florida

field measurements and sample collections. Upon writing this brief biography, it has become apparent that my career and personal life have been interwoven with several former USF Marine Science students and faculty members illustrating how this long-lived connection has developed and endured.

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My Tampa Bay area career spans 32 years beginning with the City of Tampa (1982-90), then consulting (1990-97) and county government (1997-present). My career choices have been interesting, challenging, and marked by personal and professional growth. The experience working for the City of Tampa’s Bay Study Group along with USF Marine Science graduate Roger Johansson, honed my estuarine monitoring and assessment knowledge, skills, and abilities evaluating nutrient dynamics relative to primary production drivers of Tampa Bay. I took the private sector plunge in 1990 working first for King Engineering until 1992 and then Coastal Environmental until 1997. The private sector provided exposure to wetland science, lake management, environmental assessments of hazardous materials, and the critical importance of marketing services and writing proposals; a matter of survival to secure new work. The private sector work primarily focused on watershed planning and surface water quality data reviews, assessments, and sampling program design for the Tampa Bay Estuary Program. In 1997, I landed a front line manager job in the surface water monitoring section for Pinellas County, a vacancy essentially created from USF Marine Science graduate, Tom Cuba, who left county government to start his own consulting firm.

I have been fortunate to hold various county positions beginning with an Environmental Program Manager until 2002, then three years as the Environmental Resources Management Division Director followed by Assistant Director of the Environmental Management Department in 2005. With the economic downturn and dissolution of the Environmental Management Department in late 2010, I assumed the role of the county’s Coastal Manager.

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Alumni Notes Continued - Andy Squires, 1984


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Andy Squires, on Norfolk Dredging Company’s “Charleston”

My overall county experience includes surface water monitoring and assessment, watershed management, and department administration covering water quality, air quality, land management, code enforcement, pollution prevention, water and navigation, and finally coastal (beach) management. My current working title is the Coastal and Freshwater Resources Unit Manager.

The Unit encompasses programs for 1) Coastal Management (shoreline change assessment, beach nourishment, inlet management); 2) Water and Navigation (dock permitting, mangrove trimming, waterway marker maintenance, and derelict vessel removal);

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3) Environmental Monitoring (for surface water quality, seagrass, stream nutrient loading, stream bioassessments, benthic sediment quality; and
4) RESTORE Act Planning to create a county plan for use of RESTORE Act civil penalty funds resulting from the 2010 BP Oil Spill.

My USF Marine Science network remains strong and includes several USF Marine Science graduates and faculty members. I have frequent interactions with alumni including county coworkers Kelli Hammer-Levy, Mark Flock, and Jim Bennett, and local environmental consultants Beau Suthard, Tom Cuba, and Doug Robison. College of Marine Science faculty members Ernst Peebles and Mark Luther, as well as Marine Science graduate and USF School of Geosciences Senior Instructor Mark Hafen are RESTORE Act Working Group committee members advising county staff on RESTORE Act planning efforts.

What about life outside of the workplace? I married Debbie in 1982. Our 27-year old daughter, Lauren, is a registered nurse working in St. Petersburg who helped treat USF Associate Professor Mark Luther after his serious injury a few years ago. My free time in recent years has been spent traveling with Debbie, caring for parents, and bicycling with local clubs and Marine Science alumni Doug Robison, Bruce Barber, and Steve Walker. My USF Marine Science experience and connections continue to serve me well in work and play.

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Alumni Notes - Beau Suthard, MS. 2005


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Beau Suthard on Brazilian Coast

After graduating from Al Hine’s lab in 2005 with an MS, I immediately began working for Coastal Planning & Engineering, Inc. (CPE) as a Coastal Geologist. CPE specializes in coastal restoration, with an emphasis in beach renourishment and restoration. At CPE my duties began as a field scientist using the geophysical tools and knowledge I learned at USF CMS and Eckerd College to map beach-compatible sand resources offshore the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts of the United States. In addition, I assisted CPE’s Brazil office with multiple geologic mapping cruises for infrastructure construction projects throughout the Atlantic coast of Brazil.

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In one of the more interesting assignments I have had at CPE, CPE was called to assist the State of Louisiana as they responded to the Deepwater Horizon disaster. CPE, under contract to the Shaw Group’s Emergency Response contract with Louisiana, mobilized three separate, fully outfitted geophysical survey vessels. I spent time on these vessels, operating around the clock with my CPE colleagues, for 45 days in the summer of 2010. We mapped beach-compatible sand resources for use in an “Emergency Berm” project. The berm would be constructed along the barrier islands of Louisiana in an effort to reduce the area of impact from the Deepwater Horizon oil. In the end, we collected and analyzed more than 3,300 kilometers of geophysical data and more than 100 vibracores, resulting in the identification and detailed geologic mapping of over 26 million cubic meters of beach compatible sand in seven separate offshore source areas.

During my time at CPE, my role has expanded to include project management, I became a Junior Partner, and ultimately founded and managed a local St. Petersburg-based “Tampa Bay Regional Office” for CPE, which currently has five employees and is located in office space just across Bayboro Harbor from USF CMS on Salt Creek.

Lately, in addition to continued field work, my main professional responsibilities are managing CPE’s projects with Pinellas County and the Town of Longboat Key. In addition, I am the project manager for a new, exciting CPE project with the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA). The MEA recently hired CPE to conduct a high-resolution geophysical survey of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) offshore Maryland in an area designated by the United States Department of Interior as the Maryland Wind Energy Area (WEA).

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Alumni Notes - Cont - Beau Suthard, MS. 2005


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The m/v Scarlett Isabella heading offshore through Ocean City Inlet to begin the Maryland Energy Administration 2D High Resolution Geophysical Survey

Me and my fellow CPE scientists are spending approximately six weeks offshore Maryland this summer living and working aboard the 136 foot long Scarlett Isabella, using sidescan sonar, multi-beam bathymetry, magnetometer, and two types of seismic sub-surface imaging systems to create a high-resolution map of the ocean floor and its subsurface geology. The survey will consist of over 3,000 kilometers of survey track lines encompassing 320 square kilometers of seafloor 15 to 50 kilometers off Maryland’s Atlantic coast in the WEA. The data being collected will be critical for future wind energy developers. As such, the State of Maryland funded this survey in an effort to “kick start” wind energy development in Maryland and to entice developers to bid on Maryland’s future OCS lease sale for wind energy.

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Over the last eight years, I have been rewarded with increased interaction with other USF CMS graduates, including sharing office space (and the occasional beer) with Bruce Barber (a PhD graduate from 1984), and managing CPE’s contract with the Pinellas County Coastal Management Program, which is headed by USF CMS graduate Andy Squires. I continue to have multiple professional and personal relationships with past and current USF CMS students, which has been facilitated by the fact that my wife Cortney and I have settled here in St. Petersburg along with many other USF CMS alumni.

As CPE continues to grow, having been purchased by the Shaw Group in 2011, which was then acquired by CB&I in 2013, I find myself continuing to do the things I love that USF CMS trained me for, albeit for a much larger animal than where I began back in 2005 after graduation from USF CMS. I have USF CMS faculty, staff, and alumni to thank for preparing me for this career, and for facilitating its growth.

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Beau and the CPE team retrieving the multi-channel hydrophone streamer
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Florida Institute of Oceanography News


R/V Bellows

For more than four decades, the Florida Institute of Oceanography, housed in the same building as the USF College of Marine Science, has unified marine science interests across Florida in the cause of understanding and stewardship of the oceans. Many students, staff, and faculty in the Department and now College of Marine Science (formed in 2000) have been using the Florida Institute for Oceanography's research vessels for years as a viable and inexpensive way to conduct research along the west Florida shelf, the Florida Keys, the Bahamas, and even all the way down to Puerto Rico.

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Having the R/V Bellows and eventually the R/V Suncoaster virtually in our backyard has directly aided our marine science program and for sure has provided invaluable sea-going experiences for members of our program. Even though FIO provides ship availability for some 21 members of the FIO Consortium within the state including the 10 state universities, the USF Department/ College of Marine Science has bought ~50% of the shiptime over the years. We have been, by far, the primary user.

Eventually, the R/V Suncoaster became too old and unsafe to conduct seagoing operations, and she was sold. But, in her place, FIO, through Bill Hogarth's hard work, obtained a former UNOLS vessel called the R/V Weatherbird II. She is much larger than the R/V Suncoaster and provides a much greater level of at-sea capability. So, FIO's (and our) seagoing capability advanced enormously with the acquisition of the wonderful new vessel.

FIO recently took a leading national role in the scientific assessment of the impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, involving numerous scientists and students from around Florida. FIO's R/V Bellows and R/V Weatherbird II continue to take scientists out to sea on research and sampling cruises to investigate the oil spill.

In February, with Dr. Kendra Daly as the PI and Leslie Schwierzke-Wade as the Chief Scientist, the R/V Bellows went to the northern Gulf of Mexico to collect on-going samples of zooplankton, water quality parameters, and sediments for hydrocarbon analysis.

In March, Dr. Steven Murawksi and engineers from the Center for Ocean Technology took the R/V Weatherbird II out along the underwater pipeline to test their new fish-camera, CBASS.

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Recent Glider Activities - Ocean Technology Group


cover-photo3 By Chad Lembke, Ocean Engineer, College of Marine Science Ocean Technology Group.

Throughout society, the use of robots for work too difficult or costly for humans has increased dramatically in recent decades. In the marine environment, one such platform, the autonomous underwater profiling glider, is tailored to efficiently collect data throughout the water column, over weeks to months while traversing hundreds to thousands of kilometers while sending valuable data back to researchers several times


USF’s Slocum Glider Bass prepared for deployment

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a day. Recently, one of USF’s gliders teamed up with NOAA’s SouthEast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC), Loggerhead Instruments, and North Carolina State University to conduct a deployment along the southeastern coast from Cape Canaveral, FL to Cape Fear, NC. This proof of concept mission resulted in multi-disciplinary data sets of physical, biological, and acoustics.

The primary objective of this work was focused on the passive acoustic recordings the glider collected of soniferous organisms with intent to (a) provide context for relative spatial distributions of multiple species, focusing on red grouper but including others as data permit, (b) enable location of acoustically detected single- or multi-species “hotspots”, and (c) provide potential locations of winter spawning aggregations for aggregating species. To accomplish this, enhanced mission planning was needed to handle operating in the Gulf Stream and coastal shelf waters off of South Carolina. With the help of former USF CMS graduate Ruoying He and his SABGOM models the glider was piloted in and out of currents nearly 8 times faster than the glider can propel itself. Once off the coast of SC, the glider loitered in the 40-80m isobaths, targeted for grouper spawning event monitoring by SEFSC, for over two weeks. During the deployment, the glider was monitored on our glider page, as well as on the SouthEast Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (SECOORA) webpage. The month long deployment ended Aprli 1, 2014, producing data sets of conductivity, temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence, CDOM, backscatter fluorescence, dissolved oxygen, passive acoustic recordings, and acoustically tagged animal detections. The passive acoustic recordings are currently being analyzed by former CMS faculty member David Mann and graduate Carrie Wall.

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Morgan Family Supporting Bulls in Big Way


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George and Jane Morgan are supporting the Bulls in a big way with an $8 million planned gift to the university. Photo courtesy of USF

USF Foundation Board member George Morgan and his wife, Jane, are supporting the Bulls in a big way with an $8 million planned gift to the university and part of the donation will help ensure the future success of USF College of Marine Science.

The gift provides $3 million to establish the George & Jane Morgan Endowment for Excellence in Marine Science. The gift also provides $2 million to Athletics and $3 million to the College of Business.

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“An endowment gift like this one is of vital importance for the College of Marine Science,” said Dean Jacqueline Dixon. “It will provide our faculty and students with a steady source of funding that may be used to enhance the academic enterprise at the college, providing a boon for both education and research.”

The official announcement was made at the Feb. 28 USF Foundation Board at the start of the second phase of the USF: Unstoppable Campaign.

“I am delighted that Jane and I can make these gifts to the University of South Florida,” said Morgan, a 1976 USF graduate. “As a longtime member of the USF community, I have seen firsthand the ways in which giving improves the lives of our students and faculty. Through these endowed gifts, Jane and I know that we will also make a difference for generations to come. I hope, through our example, to inspire others to think of giving to the USF System when they are making their estate plans.”

Your planned gift can also help transform the College of Marine Science and support our mission to become one of the top oceanographic institutions in world, one that is recognized as a leader in applying science to society’s needs through research, service and training of future scientists. To learn more about your options to support the College of Marine Science, please E. Howard Rutherford, Director of Development- (727) 553-3376 or hrutherford@usf.edu

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In Memory


Charles Jones Machinist, CMS Ocean Technology Group

cover-photo3 Charlie passed away on February 25th, 2014. An original member of the staff of the Center for Ocean Technology, Charlie served COT as a machinist until he retired at the end of 2008. He machined many of the underwater pressure vessels housing the oceanographic


Charles (Charlie) Jones (1932-2014)


instrumentation created at COT. He was an out of the box thinker and innovator. Many times he was able to improvise a solution to a problem that no one else would have considered.

A friendly and considerate man Charlie possessed a unique sense of humor. He had a particular fondness for bad jokes and could deliver one after another. “What is the best time for a dentist appointment?” “Two-thirty” (Tooth hurty – get it). He loved to explain his jokes to all. Those of us that knew him had a genuine affection for Charlie. He treated everyone with a respectful and caring attitude. He was devoted to his family and friends and was genuinely concerned for the well- being of those he knew. We will always miss his generosity and kindness here at COT – we will always miss you Charlie.

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Evamaria Koch, PhD, 1993, College of Marine Science

cover-photo3Dr. Evamaria Wysk Koch, of Easton, passed away on Thursday, March 13, 2014 at 9 PM at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore from complications of lung cancer. Like many other lung cancer victims, she had never smoked and she maintained a healthy lifestyle. By the time the cancer was detected in July of 2013, it had progressed too far for surgery and chemotherapy ultimately failed.

Evamaria Koch (1961-2014)


Evamaria was born to German parents in Porto Alegre, Brazil, on May 11, 1961. She grew up in Brazil enjoying the outdoors and her family. She developed an interest in environmental science at an early age. She received her BS in Oceanography from the Universidade de Rio Grande, Brazil, and her MS in Biology and PhD in Marine Science from the University of South Florida. She carried out postdoctoral studies at the University of Connecticut Avery Point Laboratory. She joined the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory in 1995 as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2001. She was author or co-author of more than 60 papers, book chapters, or technical reports. She was major advisor to 13 graduate students and 2 postdoctoral scholars. She belonged to 5 professional associations, organized numerous sessions at professional meetings and was a founding member of the World Seagrass Association.

Dr. Koch’s area of expertise was seagrass ecology, but her interest was more than academic. She loved seagrasses. She loved scuba diving and swimming through waving meadows of seagrasses, talking about seagrasses and visiting seagrasses in different parts of the world.

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In Memory - Cont


She carried out her research with great energy, enthusiasm, and insight. Evamaria and her students made many important advances in our understanding of seagrasses, especially interactions between seagrass beds and their physical and sedimentary environments.

Dr. Koch was an active member of the Scientific and Technical Analysis Committee for the Maryland Coastal Bays Program. She was also an active member of the Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Workgroup in the Chesapeake Bay Program.

cover-photo3 She was a key contributor to the Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Technical Syntheses, which have helped to guide SAV restoration efforts in Chesapeake Bay. Her unique contribution in both Chincoteague and Chesapeake Bays was

Evamaria conducting a seagrass survey.

to provide a hydrodynamical and sedimentological perspective on SAV ecology.

Evamaria’s greatest calling in life, however, was as a mother. She was fiercely determined to be a mom, and to that end she was blessed to be able to adopt her daughter Olga Koch-Eilers, who became the light of her life and the center of her world.

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She spent countless hours traveling to and from school events, dance lessons, skating lessons, and skating competitions throughout the mid-Atlantic region. She would talk about Olga to anyone who would listen, her face alight with joy and pride.

In addition to Olga, Evamaria is survived by her brother Walter W. Koch, sister-in-law Claudia Y. Koch, and nieces Caroline and Catherine Y. Koch, of Sao Paolo, Brazil. She is also survived by her mother Eva W. Koch, most recently of Easton. She was preceded in death by her father Walter Koch.

Evamaria was multi-lingual, speaking fluent German, Portuguese and English. She was a conscientious practicing environmentalist and a rigorous experimental scientist. She was a single mom who held down a demanding job and cared for her mother at the same time. But more than all of her accomplishments, she was an integral and active member of multiple communities of scientists, mothers, family members, and friends. She will be sorely missed by all who knew her.

A memorial service was held on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM at Grace Lutheran Church, 111 Brookletts Ave, Easton, MD. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Evamaria Koch Student Travel Fund of the World Seagrass Association. Another acknowledgment of Evamaria’s influence on her scientific community can be found on the World Seagrass Association’s website.

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In Memory - Cont


Asbury Sallenger, PhD, US Geological Survey

cover-photo3As one of the “founding fathers” of the US Geological Survey’s Coastal and Marine Science Center located about two blocks away from the USF College of Marine Science, “Abby” was a wonderful friend and colleague to many of us—faculty, students, and staff. He passed away on February 5, 2013. We all miss him. He was an integral part of the CMS community and the nation’s coastal marine research community.


Asbury Sallenger, PhD, US Geological Survey

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Abby on the North Carolina Outer Banks after Hurricane Dennis
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